• The Course of Objects – the fine lines of inquiry, TACA's 2014 biennial exhibition; a short film by filmmaker Carolyn Constantine; 16:30 mins; includes interviews with curator, Susan Ostling and artists, Simone Fraser and Toni Warburton in their studios; exhibition held at Manly Art Gallery & Museum from 2 May to 8 June 2014.
  • DVD, 32 minutes, B&W with narration by American potter Warren Mackenzie; 17 minutes of bonus footage taken at the pottery in 1952; 14 page booklet by Shoji Hamada.
  • While most surveys of contemporary art focus largely on two-dimensional work, there is a growing movement of emerging as well as established artists that are producing work in the ceramic medium, creating three-dimensional work that is groundbreaking in scope. Working in clay or porcelain and utilizing traditional methods such as wheel throwing or hand building, artists use their considerable talents to create unique work that is truly one-of-a-kind. Whether a sculptural piece, traditional vessel or a large-scale installation, they are constrained only by their imaginations and the nature of the material. Contains process shots of the artists at work as well as a voyeur’s glimpse into their studios. Artists featured include Case Studyo in collaboration with Parra, Steve Harrington, Mike Perry, Todd James, Cleon Peterson, Horfee, Cody Hudson and Friends With You, as well as Heath Ceramics, Peter Shire, Katsuyo Aoki, Kate MacDowell, Mark Whalen, Claire Partington, Lauren Shapiro, gritCERAMICS, Livia Marin, Steven Young Lee, Jess Riva Cooper, Kouzo Takeuchi, THEONE Ceramics, Beth Cavener and Lindsay Scypta.
  • The Potter's Dictionary of Materials and Techniques provides a comprehensive guide to the tools, materials and techniques of ceramic art. Structured in an accessible A-Z format, and packed with full-colour illustrations and sound, practical explanations, this reference work is widely known as 'the potter's bible'. The 6th edition of this classic text has been thoroughly updated, with new entries on topics ranging from aerogel to smoke crackle, and from teabowls to 3D printing, as well as many revised and updated entries. The Dictionary also includes useful technical and resource information. For the first time, the book is presented in full colour, with images showing ceramics material, processes and products. A must-have resource for every potter's studio, workshop or bookshelf, The Potter's Dictionary is the essential companion for anyone working in clay.
  • An insightful essay by Milton Moon, a potter for close to sixty years, about the concept of Wabi, as expressed by the Chawan within the tea ceremony.
  • There is so much potential in a paint brush. It is hard for me to see it as just a functional tool whose only purpose is to move paint from palette to canvas or from bucket to ware. I've discovered that a brush has weight, personality, feeling and form, and that these create a world of possibilities and interpretations in every uniquely crafted paint brush. Before I made my own paint brushes all I expected of a brush was that one would serve me exactly as another would if it had the same manufacturer and labeling.  I was happy when a brush didn't deviate from my expectations of it. I've had handmade paint brushes on my radar for most of my adult life.  When I started focusing on high quality pottery tools it was natural for me to challenge myself to a much higher degree of excellence in making paint brushes. Why couldn't they be made with exceptional quality and care, each one unique, with an expression and a life of its own?  The brush head, ferrule, handle and display materials open creative possibilities. While I like the traditional simplicity of bamboo brushes, I also want to take the brush a personal direction, so combining wood and clay has been a natural direction to pursue. I turn wooden handles and make brush ferrules out of clay, firing them alongside my other pottery. My brushes become an integral synthesis of what I'm doing in my other studios. As a potter I acknowledge how functionality and artistic aesthetics are compatible. I envision paint brushes that stand on their own as works of art without compromising functionality. I like that many dedicated handmade brush makers have gone before me, that I am part of a quest to build the better paint brush. I hope to inspire others on the path. I aim to make a brush that reveals its secrets and strengths through the experience of using it. I want to provide a richer experience to those who want to have the joy of using a handmade brush in their work ... and to those who would add a beautiful and functional item to their art collection.
  • There is so much potential in a paint brush. It is hard for me to see it as just a functional tool whose only purpose is to move paint from palette to canvas or from bucket to ware. I've discovered that a brush has weight, personality, feeling and form, and that these create a world of possibilities and interpretations in every uniquely crafted paint brush. Before I made my own paint brushes all I expected of a brush was that one would serve me exactly as another would if it had the same manufacturer and labeling.  I was happy when a brush didn't deviate from my expectations of it. I've had handmade paint brushes on my radar for most of my adult life.  When I started focusing on high quality pottery tools it was natural for me to challenge myself to a much higher degree of excellence in making paint brushes. Why couldn't they be made with exceptional quality and care, each one unique, with an expression and a life of its own?  The brush head, ferrule, handle and display materials open creative possibilities. While I like the traditional simplicity of bamboo brushes, I also want to take the brush a personal direction, so combining wood and clay has been a natural direction to pursue. I turn wooden handles and make brush ferrules out of clay, firing them alongside my other pottery. My brushes become an integral synthesis of what I'm doing in my other studios. As a potter I acknowledge how functionality and artistic aesthetics are compatible. I envision paint brushes that stand on their own as works of art without compromising functionality. I like that many dedicated handmade brush makers have gone before me, that I am part of a quest to build the better paint brush. I hope to inspire others on the path. I aim to make a brush that reveals its secrets and strengths through the experience of using it. I want to provide a richer experience to those who want to have the joy of using a handmade brush in their work ... and to those who would add a beautiful and functional item to their art collection.
  • There is so much potential in a paint brush. It is hard for me to see it as just a functional tool whose only purpose is to move paint from palette to canvas or from bucket to ware. I've discovered that a brush has weight, personality, feeling and form, and that these create a world of possibilities and interpretations in every uniquely crafted paint brush. Before I made my own paint brushes all I expected of a brush was that one would serve me exactly as another would if it had the same manufacturer and labeling.  I was happy when a brush didn't deviate from my expectations of it. I've had handmade paint brushes on my radar for most of my adult life.  When I started focusing on high quality pottery tools it was natural for me to challenge myself to a much higher degree of excellence in making paint brushes. Why couldn't they be made with exceptional quality and care, each one unique, with an expression and a life of its own?  The brush head, ferrule, handle and display materials open creative possibilities. While I like the traditional simplicity of bamboo brushes, I also want to take the brush a personal direction, so combining wood and clay has been a natural direction to pursue. I turn wooden handles and make brush ferrules out of clay, firing them alongside my other pottery. My brushes become an integral synthesis of what I'm doing in my other studios. As a potter I acknowledge how functionality and artistic aesthetics are compatible. I envision paint brushes that stand on their own as works of art without compromising functionality. I like that many dedicated handmade brush makers have gone before me, that I am part of a quest to build the better paint brush. I hope to inspire others on the path. I aim to make a brush that reveals its secrets and strengths through the experience of using it. I want to provide a richer experience to those who want to have the joy of using a handmade brush in their work ... and to those who would add a beautiful and functional item to their art collection.
  • There is so much potential in a paint brush. It is hard for me to see it as just a functional tool whose only purpose is to move paint from palette to canvas or from bucket to ware. I've discovered that a brush has weight, personality, feeling and form, and that these create a world of possibilities and interpretations in every uniquely crafted paint brush. Before I made my own paint brushes all I expected of a brush was that one would serve me exactly as another would if it had the same manufacturer and labeling.  I was happy when a brush didn't deviate from my expectations of it.

    I've had handmade paint brushes on my radar for most of my adult life.  When I started focusing on high quality pottery tools it was natural for me to challenge myself to a much higher degree of excellence in making paint brushes. Why couldn't they be made with exceptional quality and care, each one unique, with an expression and a life of its own?  The brush head, ferrule, handle and display materials open creative possibilities. While I like the traditional simplicity of bamboo brushes, I also want to take the brush a personal direction, so combining wood and clay has been a natural direction to pursue. I turn wooden handles and make brush ferrules out of clay, firing them alongside my other pottery. My brushes become an integral synthesis of what I'm doing in my other studios.

    As a potter I acknowledge how functionality and artistic aesthetics are compatible. I envision paint brushes that stand on their own as works of art without compromising functionality. I like that many dedicated handmade brush makers have gone before me, that I am part of a quest to build the better paint brush. I hope to inspire others on the path. I aim to make a brush that reveals its secrets and strengths through the experience of using it. I want to provide a richer experience to those who want to have the joy of using a handmade brush in their work ... and to those who would add a beautiful and functional item to their art collection.