Products & Merchandise

  • TACA Apron

    $35.00 Inc.*
    Buy our latest TACA apron with handy pocket. Limited stock.
  • Clay body additions can introduce remarkable new forms and textures in ceramic work. With an emphasis on creativity and experimentation, ceramicist Kathleen Standen reveals a range of possible effects, and profiles the extraordinary work of contemporary makers using additions in their practice. Beginning with an introduction to collecting local clay and making your own clay bodies, the book moves on to cover the array of additions being used by artists today, from hard materials like stones, glass and rust, to combustible matter and fibre, metals including wire and mesh, and colour in various forms. The book is lavishly illustrated throughout with both unique making methods and the beautiful finished works of ceramic artists from around the world. Additions to Clay Bodies is an inspiring introduction to the art of using additions and an essential companion for any artist wishing to expand their practice.
  • This book is about the artist, Naoko Yehenara – her work, the inspiration behind her it and her life, split between studios in China and Australia. It's an amazing pictorial survey of Naoko's ceramic vessels and the importance of flowers in her life, and how they come together in her ikebana arrangements. Chapters: Dr Naoko's Ceramic Art Living with Ceramics Flower and Vessel Passion for Flowers Exhibitions A Love for Animals An Exploration of Teapots Life Aesthetic Freestyle Flower Arrangements
  • The Handbook of Glaze Recipes is an essential studio companion for any potter. Covering a comprehensive range of glazes including porcelain, crystalline and raku as well as stoneware and earthenware, each recipe is illustrated with a useful test tile to demonstrate the effects of opaque, matte, and transparent glazes on different clays and at varying temperatures, and numbered for ease of reference. The book also features an introduction to the basics of mixing, applying and adjusting glazes, and correcting typical glaze faults. It also includes many clay body recipes, including a variety of ones for porcelain, wood firing and even Egyptian paste. Compiled by studio potter and glaze expert Linda Bloomfield, and based not only on on years of meticulously recorded tests, but also researched from a large assortment of established ceramic artists, The Handbook of Glaze Recipes is a must-have resource for any potter wishing to experiment or expand their glazes and clay bodies.
  • Chester Nealie – Etched in Fire is a survey of the work of New Zealand-born, Australian-based potter, Chester Nealie, who has been making pots for six decades (1964–2014) and is an international authority on the Japanese style of woodfiring, anagama. This monograph documents his prolific life and work and records an important part of New Zealand ceramics history, a valuable resource for artists, collectors and historians alike. Edited by Dr Damian Skinner, this book brings together a lifetime of work in photographs and important essays by key artists, curators and writers including Denis O’Connor, Peter Lange, Owen Rye, Grace Cochrane, Lucy Hammonds, Justine Olsen, Morag Fraser, Gillian McCracken, Andrew Grigg and Jan Irvine-Nealie; photography by Ian Hobbs, Geoff Ambler, Yuki Sato and others.
    Chapters are organised into four sections that follow the lifecycle of Nealie’s pots: making, firing, exhibiting and owning. Pots and events from different periods interact with each other, dynamically illustrating the richness of Nealie’s practice, as subjects, materials, techniques and processes emerge and evolve over 50 years, while historical images and newly commissioned photographs of his ceramics document his artistic achievement. Damian Skinner frames his introduction around a recorded interview of Chester describing his work held in the Auckland War Memorial Museum Collection. Publisher: Ron Sang Publications, 2016 ISBN: 9780473342753 320 pages, hardcover, 280 x 300mm, 327 images (11 double page, 120 full page colour), 2.8kg
  • Mastering the Potter's Wheel takes readers through all of the basics, from centreing to mastering the basic forms. What pushes this book beyond the competition, however, are the techniques offered in the chapters that follow. From a variety of methods for throwing large objects out of clay, such as pitchers and platters to alterations, darting, and paddling, this book offers potters a world of possibilities. With inspirational guest features from today's top working artists, this book is the new gold standard for potters and pottery studios everywhere. The book is broken into seven chapters:
    • The Basics
    • Building Wheel Skills
    • Making Lids, Knobs, Handles, and Spouts
    • Setting the Table
    • Altering Pots
    • Throwing Large
    • Decorating and Finishing
  • A number of important engagements occurred between Aboriginal artists and the wider art world prior to the emergence of desert or 'dot' painting from Papunya in 1971-72. The Barambah Pottery was one such example of thriving cultural activity in Queensland, a pottery studio based in the Aboriginal settlement of Cherbourg, previously Barambah Aboriginal Reserve.
  • Developing your own glazes can be tricky and success is dependent on many factors. In this book, ceramicist Greg Daly aims to demystify the process with practical advice and complete, step-by-step instructions. He covers all the essentials, from planning your recipes and recording results to mixing glazes and finding the correct firing temperature. This hands-on technical guidance is supported with helpful how-to images and example tests and recipes. For any potter beginning to experiment with fired colour, texture and decoration in their work, Developing Glazes is an essential reference, revealing workable, exciting methods for achieving the glaze results you want.
  • Sale!
    John Dermer Celebrating the Journey: 50 years at the potter’s wheel. The book candidly covers the highs and lows of a fifty-year career as a full-time potter. It is both technical and personal as it documents salt glazing, terra sigillata and tableware interspersed with building, travel and photography. The people who inspired, the events that necessitated change and the lessons learned are accompanied by historical photographs and a full catalogue of the November 2017 milestone exhibition at Yackandandah. Proudly designed, printed and bound in Australia. This book is currently on sale to coincide with John's exhibition at the NGV: https://www.ngv.vic.gov.au/exhibition/john-dermer/
  • Liz Williams: Body Language celebrates the remarkable figurative sculptures of Australian ceramicist Liz Williams. In this first comprehensive survey of her ceramics, Margot Osborne traces the evolution of Liz Williams' impressive body of coil-built ceramic sculptures commencing in the late 1970s. Over this forty-year period Williams' work was marked by an increasing refinement and technical prowess in her stylisation of the figure and her encapsulation of the subject's inner life through pose, facial expression and bodily adornment. Liz Williams: Body Language features 70 full-page colour images of Williams' ceramics and her home/studio by leading photographer Grant Hancock. It also includes essays by Catherine Speck, Damon Moon and Wendy Walker.
  • Techniques, Tips, and Tricks for Slabs, Coils, and More. From pinch pots to coiled boxes to soft slab tableware, mastering hand building is a lifelong pursuit. In this book, Sunshine Cobb covers all the foundational skills, with lessons for constructing both simple and complex forms from clay. Ceramic artists will also find a variety of next-level techniques and tips: designing templates and replicating pieces, lidded vessels, using moulds, a variety of decorative techniques, and other avenues of exploration are all inside. Artist features and inspirational galleries include work from today's top working artists, such as Bryan Hopkins, Lindsay Oesterritter, Liz Zlot Summerfield, Bandana Pottery, Shoko Teruyama, Courtney Martin, Sam Chung, Deborah Schwartzkopf, and many more.
  • Making your own glazes is a fascinating and rewarding process, even more so when making them from collected ingredients. With little equipment and following a few basic principles, it is possible to harvest glaze ingredients from your local environment, such as clay, subsoil, plants and seashells, to achieve beautiful results in the kiln. Whether you wish to make an entire glaze using collected materials, or just want to use them as additions to existing base recipes, Miranda Forrest explains how to source and prepare natural ingredients, from degraded rocks to seaweed, as well as giving step-by-step instructions for mixing a glaze, testing samples, and finally applying glazes and firing your work. Contributions from contemporary ceramicists who use natural glaze ingredients give a detailed insight into their working methods and intriguing results. Encouraging experimentation and a creative approach, Natural Glazes is a vital resource for anyone wishing to work in a more natural, sustainable way to develop their unique glaze effects.
  • ReFire - a project of contemporary pottery at the Ration Shed 2017. The works published in this wonderful book show the power of our visual culture and the talent of our artists. ReFire honours the legacy of the early Cherbourg potters while breaking new ground in the refinement and individual expression that we all seek in contemporary art.
  • Throwing is an important skill for any potter to master, using only a few tools, the guidance of their hands, and the momentum of a wheel. Having spent his life making pots and teaching others to make them, Richard Phethean describes essential techniques for working on the wheel with an eye for the practical. He covers a range of forms, from simple domestic pots to more complex vessels, with the aim of building makers' confidence in throwing techniques. The book features clear instructions for creating each type of vessel, accompanied by illustrated step-by-step instructions, which demonstrate the techniques described. It also profiles the work of contemporary potters for whom throwing is a vital part of their practice. Throwing is an essential companion for anyone attempting to master the art of forming pots on the wheel.
  • Sale!
    Was $55, now $44! Clay is back: the age-old craft of ceramics is being embraced by a new generation of urban makers and collectors. Author Katie Treggiden explores the contemporary revival of pottery, focusing on six inspiring cities and their makers. 27 young and passionate ceramicists in New York, London, Tokyo, Copenhagen, Sydney and Sao Paulo introduce us to their work, their studios and their inspiration. Urban Potters: Makers in the City will appeal to a broad audience – not only those who practice pottery themselves, but anyone who is interested in the handmade. The book also includes a practical source list of places to buy handmade ceramics in the six cities featured.
  • Sale!
    Was $80, now $64! A global survey of 100 of today's most important clay and ceramic artists, chosen by leading art world professionals. Vitamin C celebrates the revival of clay as a material for contemporary visual artists, featuring a wide range of global talent as selected by the world's leading curators, critics, and art professionals. Clay and ceramics have in recent years been elevated from craft to high art material, with the resulting artworks being coveted by collectors and exhibited in museums around the world. Packed with illustrations, Vitamin C is a vibrant and incredibly timely survey - the first of its kind. Artists include: Caroline Achaintre, Ai Weiwei, Aaron Angell, Edmund de Waal, Theaster Gates, Marisa Merz, Ron Nagle, Gabriel Orozco, Grayson Perry, Sterling Ruby, Thomas Schütte, Richard Slee, Clare Twomey, Jesse Wine, Betty Woodman, and Lynda Draper. Nominators include: Pablo Leon de la Barra, Iwona Blazwick, Mary Ceruti, Dan Fox, Jens Hoffmann, Christine Macel, James Meyer, Jed Morse, Beatrix Ruf, Patrizia Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, Nancy Spector, Sheena Wagstaff, and Jonathan Watkins.
  • This book is second hand In Wood-fired Ceramics, Coll Minogue and Robert Sanderson briefly describe the development of the main types of wood-fired kilns used by today's potters. They then present the aesthetic aims, working practices, and kilns of an international group of artists. Clay, glaze, and slip recipes, kiln firing logs, and kiln plans are also included. Work by over sixty artists illustrates the text, and represents of the diversity of styles in contemporary wood-fired ceramics.
  • The range of extraordinary effects that can be achieved in a kiln is infinite. However, the technical requirements of different firing processes and equipment can often seem intimidating, particularly for those new to ceramics, and this can limit artists' confidence to explore and experiment. In Firing Kilns, woodfire potter Benedict Brierley demystifies the firing process, explaining key methods and effects in simple, straightforward language. Beginning with the basic principles, including heatwork, firing schedules and cones, the book goes on to cover the various types of kilns and kiln packing, oxidation and reduction firing, and then special firing methods such as salt, soda, wood, pit, smoke and raku. Finally, it covers common firing faults and how these can be avoided to achieve consistent, successful results. Firing Kilns is a comprehensive handbook for anyone new to firing or for established ceramicists wishing to experiment with different effects.
  • This short film is about Danish artist Ane-Katrine von Bulow. It shows her process of making porcelain forms and applying designs to them. She develops 2D designs which she silkscreen prints onto tissue and then transfers onto her 3D vessels. Duration: 1
  • Written by Allan's close friend, Allan Baptist, the book is a gentle tribute to Ivan, his life, work and travels and shows the great contribution he made to the appreciation and understanding of pottery in Australia.
  • 5 Stones details Steve Harrison's recent 15 years of research into single stone porcelain. 205 pages, 125,000 words, full colour, soft cover. Written, collated, printed and bound on the kitchen table – a limited edition handmade book.
  • 6th edition (September 2018); revised and enlarged, includes DVD. 92 pages, 40 colour illustrations, 12 kiln plans
  • Now firmly established in the ceramics world, paperclay is a vital part of the modern clay artist and potter's repertoire. The workability of this material allows expressive freedom and imagination at every stage in the creative process, from wet to dry. Paperclay, made with new or recycled paper, is remarkable for its flexibility, unfired strength, and the ease with which it can be repaired, and allows the creation of beautiful finished forms. Building on the immense success of her previous Ceramics Handbook Paper Clay, pioneering artist, researcher and teacher Rosette Gault (M.F.A.) explains how potters and clay sculptors can make, fire and use the material. In addition to the basics, she introduces more advanced techniques for building armatures, sculpting figures and making works for the wall. Packed throughout with photographs of inspiring works by a new generation of paperclay artists, Paperclay: Art and Practice is an essential introduction to the medium.
  • In this inspiring practical guide, porcelain artist Vivienne Foley introduces ceramicists to the material she has been working with for more than forty years. The book takes a comprehensive look at all aspects of porcelain, and covers everything from its composition and workability, to decorating and glazing. Methods of throwing and building are thoroughly covered, with a focus on techniques and faults specific to porcelain. Drying and firing is also discussed, and there is a useful troubleshooting section on all the most likely problems and faults along with suggested remedies. Beginning with the fascinating history of making in porcelain, from the Imperial kilns of China to the Meissen factory of Germany and beyond, this book offers an insight into the way porcelain has been used in the past and how it has been adapted and developed for contemporary work, by current artists who are constantly looking to push the boundaries of possibility. Illustrated throughout with helpful how-to images, as well as the beautiful works of current artists, Porcelain is the essential handbook for any ceramic student or artist seeking to understand and work with this extraordinary material.
  • Copyright 2003 A Personal Approach; revised edition, includes CD; 58 pages; 31 colour images; 12 B/W illustrations.
  • Handbuilding with clay offers a unique opportunity to experiment, requiring few tools, and allowing intuition and imagination to come to the fore. In this overview of a fast-developing practice, artist Claire Loder explains time-honoured methods of handbuilding, as well as introducing the fascinating new approaches of contemporary ceramicists. The basic techniques, from coiling and pinching to working with slabs, are explained with practical instructions and helpful accompanying images. Equipment, clay bodies and studio advice are thoroughly covered. Through the work of today's makers, the book then looks at new methods of building by hand, including mixed media work, sculptural methods, vessels and surface decoration, illuminating a wide variety of forms and styles. Sculpting and Handbuilding is an essential guide for any ceramic artist or student wishing to learn the basics of handbuilding, or seeking inspiration to integrate and adapt conventional methods.
  • This step-by-step guide will encourage the reader to explore the full range of surface treatment techniques and help them to give a professional finish to their work by guiding them to an appropriate finish choice. Surface Decoration looks at all manner of surface decoration techniques, at every stage of the ceramic process and from a practical perspective explains how to achieve these effects. The book explores a variety of innovative and contemporary approaches to surface finish, including sgraffito, resist methods, sprigging, trailing, glaze layering, lustre, transfer, impressing, incising and textural methods amongst others. This is the perfect guide for any ceramic artist interested in exploring new surface decoration techniques.
  • Artists are increasingly interested in producing work that is not only beautifully designed and produced, but is also environmentally friendly and socially responsible. In Sustainable Ceramics, pioneer Robert Harrison draws on more than four decades of making, and a wealth of experience shared by other artists to present practical possibilities for ceramic artists.This book covers all the factors to consider when going 'green', from fuels and alternative firing technology to energy-saving methods, sustainable ways to collect and use clay itself, and ways to deal with or recycle waste materials and save water. He suggests simple and achievable methods by which to reduce the carbon footprint of ceramic art, and draws on interviews and examples throughout by practitioners who reclaim, reuse and recycle in their studio or work.
    Sustainable Ceramics is an essential resource for any ceramicist, studio or school looking for ideas on how to reduce the impact of their practice on the environment.
  • The Ceramics Reader is an impressive collection of essays and text extracts which covers all the key areas of ceramics – both past and present. It focuses on thoughts and discussions within ceramics from the last 20-30 years in particular, but also gives the reader a broad overview of the last 100 years. One aim of the book is to introduce contemporary debates, raise awareness and stimulate thought rather than to present a closed case for examination. Consequently the essays or extracts present different approaches to give a rounded viewpoint. Beginning with essential questions such as 'Why are ceramics important?' it also considers the field of ceramics from a range of perspectives – as a cultural activity, ceramics as metaphor, where it sits within arts and crafts, within gender discussions, ceramics as sculpture, the use of ceramics as a vehicle for propaganda, ceramics within industry, within museums, and most recently as part of the 'expanded field' as a Fine Art medium and vehicle for ideas.
  • The Course of Objects – the fine lines of inquiry, TACA's 2014 biennial exhibition; a short film by filmmaker Carolyn Constantine; 16:30 mins; includes interviews with curator, Susan Ostling and artists, Simone Fraser and Toni Warburton in their studios; exhibition held at Manly Art Gallery & Museum from 2 May to 8 June 2014.
  • DVD, 32 minutes, B&W with narration by American potter Warren Mackenzie; 17 minutes of bonus footage taken at the pottery in 1952; 14 page booklet by Shoji Hamada.
  • While most surveys of contemporary art focus largely on two-dimensional work, there is a growing movement of emerging as well as established artists that are producing work in the ceramic medium, creating three-dimensional work that is groundbreaking in scope. Working in clay or porcelain and utilizing traditional methods such as wheel throwing or hand building, artists use their considerable talents to create unique work that is truly one-of-a-kind. Whether a sculptural piece, traditional vessel or a large-scale installation, they are constrained only by their imaginations and the nature of the material. Contains process shots of the artists at work as well as a voyeur’s glimpse into their studios. Artists featured include Case Studyo in collaboration with Parra, Steve Harrington, Mike Perry, Todd James, Cleon Peterson, Horfee, Cody Hudson and Friends With You, as well as Heath Ceramics, Peter Shire, Katsuyo Aoki, Kate MacDowell, Mark Whalen, Claire Partington, Lauren Shapiro, gritCERAMICS, Livia Marin, Steven Young Lee, Jess Riva Cooper, Kouzo Takeuchi, THEONE Ceramics, Beth Cavener and Lindsay Scypta.
  • The Potter's Dictionary of Materials and Techniques provides a comprehensive guide to the tools, materials and techniques of ceramic art. Structured in an accessible A-Z format, and packed with full-colour illustrations and sound, practical explanations, this reference work is widely known as 'the potter's bible'. The 6th edition of this classic text has been thoroughly updated, with new entries on topics ranging from aerogel to smoke crackle, and from teabowls to 3D printing, as well as many revised and updated entries. The Dictionary also includes useful technical and resource information. For the first time, the book is presented in full colour, with images showing ceramics material, processes and products. A must-have resource for every potter's studio, workshop or bookshelf, The Potter's Dictionary is the essential companion for anyone working in clay.
  • An insightful essay by Milton Moon, a potter for close to sixty years, about the concept of Wabi, as expressed by the Chawan within the tea ceremony.
  • There is so much potential in a paint brush. It is hard for me to see it as just a functional tool whose only purpose is to move paint from palette to canvas or from bucket to ware. I've discovered that a brush has weight, personality, feeling and form, and that these create a world of possibilities and interpretations in every uniquely crafted paint brush. Before I made my own paint brushes all I expected of a brush was that one would serve me exactly as another would if it had the same manufacturer and labeling.  I was happy when a brush didn't deviate from my expectations of it. I've had handmade paint brushes on my radar for most of my adult life.  When I started focusing on high quality pottery tools it was natural for me to challenge myself to a much higher degree of excellence in making paint brushes. Why couldn't they be made with exceptional quality and care, each one unique, with an expression and a life of its own?  The brush head, ferrule, handle and display materials open creative possibilities. While I like the traditional simplicity of bamboo brushes, I also want to take the brush a personal direction, so combining wood and clay has been a natural direction to pursue. I turn wooden handles and make brush ferrules out of clay, firing them alongside my other pottery. My brushes become an integral synthesis of what I'm doing in my other studios. As a potter I acknowledge how functionality and artistic aesthetics are compatible. I envision paint brushes that stand on their own as works of art without compromising functionality. I like that many dedicated handmade brush makers have gone before me, that I am part of a quest to build the better paint brush. I hope to inspire others on the path. I aim to make a brush that reveals its secrets and strengths through the experience of using it. I want to provide a richer experience to those who want to have the joy of using a handmade brush in their work ... and to those who would add a beautiful and functional item to their art collection.
  • There is so much potential in a paint brush. It is hard for me to see it as just a functional tool whose only purpose is to move paint from palette to canvas or from bucket to ware. I've discovered that a brush has weight, personality, feeling and form, and that these create a world of possibilities and interpretations in every uniquely crafted paint brush. Before I made my own paint brushes all I expected of a brush was that one would serve me exactly as another would if it had the same manufacturer and labeling.  I was happy when a brush didn't deviate from my expectations of it. I've had handmade paint brushes on my radar for most of my adult life.  When I started focusing on high quality pottery tools it was natural for me to challenge myself to a much higher degree of excellence in making paint brushes. Why couldn't they be made with exceptional quality and care, each one unique, with an expression and a life of its own?  The brush head, ferrule, handle and display materials open creative possibilities. While I like the traditional simplicity of bamboo brushes, I also want to take the brush a personal direction, so combining wood and clay has been a natural direction to pursue. I turn wooden handles and make brush ferrules out of clay, firing them alongside my other pottery. My brushes become an integral synthesis of what I'm doing in my other studios. As a potter I acknowledge how functionality and artistic aesthetics are compatible. I envision paint brushes that stand on their own as works of art without compromising functionality. I like that many dedicated handmade brush makers have gone before me, that I am part of a quest to build the better paint brush. I hope to inspire others on the path. I aim to make a brush that reveals its secrets and strengths through the experience of using it. I want to provide a richer experience to those who want to have the joy of using a handmade brush in their work ... and to those who would add a beautiful and functional item to their art collection.
  • There is so much potential in a paint brush. It is hard for me to see it as just a functional tool whose only purpose is to move paint from palette to canvas or from bucket to ware. I've discovered that a brush has weight, personality, feeling and form, and that these create a world of possibilities and interpretations in every uniquely crafted paint brush. Before I made my own paint brushes all I expected of a brush was that one would serve me exactly as another would if it had the same manufacturer and labeling.  I was happy when a brush didn't deviate from my expectations of it. I've had handmade paint brushes on my radar for most of my adult life.  When I started focusing on high quality pottery tools it was natural for me to challenge myself to a much higher degree of excellence in making paint brushes. Why couldn't they be made with exceptional quality and care, each one unique, with an expression and a life of its own?  The brush head, ferrule, handle and display materials open creative possibilities. While I like the traditional simplicity of bamboo brushes, I also want to take the brush a personal direction, so combining wood and clay has been a natural direction to pursue. I turn wooden handles and make brush ferrules out of clay, firing them alongside my other pottery. My brushes become an integral synthesis of what I'm doing in my other studios. As a potter I acknowledge how functionality and artistic aesthetics are compatible. I envision paint brushes that stand on their own as works of art without compromising functionality. I like that many dedicated handmade brush makers have gone before me, that I am part of a quest to build the better paint brush. I hope to inspire others on the path. I aim to make a brush that reveals its secrets and strengths through the experience of using it. I want to provide a richer experience to those who want to have the joy of using a handmade brush in their work ... and to those who would add a beautiful and functional item to their art collection.
  • There is so much potential in a paint brush. It is hard for me to see it as just a functional tool whose only purpose is to move paint from palette to canvas or from bucket to ware. I've discovered that a brush has weight, personality, feeling and form, and that these create a world of possibilities and interpretations in every uniquely crafted paint brush. Before I made my own paint brushes all I expected of a brush was that one would serve me exactly as another would if it had the same manufacturer and labeling.  I was happy when a brush didn't deviate from my expectations of it.

    I've had handmade paint brushes on my radar for most of my adult life.  When I started focusing on high quality pottery tools it was natural for me to challenge myself to a much higher degree of excellence in making paint brushes. Why couldn't they be made with exceptional quality and care, each one unique, with an expression and a life of its own?  The brush head, ferrule, handle and display materials open creative possibilities. While I like the traditional simplicity of bamboo brushes, I also want to take the brush a personal direction, so combining wood and clay has been a natural direction to pursue. I turn wooden handles and make brush ferrules out of clay, firing them alongside my other pottery. My brushes become an integral synthesis of what I'm doing in my other studios.

    As a potter I acknowledge how functionality and artistic aesthetics are compatible. I envision paint brushes that stand on their own as works of art without compromising functionality. I like that many dedicated handmade brush makers have gone before me, that I am part of a quest to build the better paint brush. I hope to inspire others on the path. I aim to make a brush that reveals its secrets and strengths through the experience of using it. I want to provide a richer experience to those who want to have the joy of using a handmade brush in their work ... and to those who would add a beautiful and functional item to their art collection.